Championship Fighting: Explosive Punching and Aggressive Defense

You're the Kayo Kid

Автор:
Dempsey Jack
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Глава:
Глава 6. You're the Kayo Kid
Виды спорта:
Бокс
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Методики подготовки
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США
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Аннотация

To protect yourself with your fists, you must become a knockout puncher. And you may do that within three months, if you're a normal chap-anywhere between twelve and forty. By "normal" I mean healthy and sound-neither ailing nor crippled. You should be able to knock out a fellow of approximately

You're the Kayo Kid

To protect yourself with your fists, you must become a knockout puncher. And you may do that within three months, if you're a normal chap-anywhere between twelve and forty. By "normal" I mean healthy and sound-neither ailing nor crippled.

You should be able to knock out a fellow of approximately your own weight, with either fist, if you follow my instructions exactly and practice them diligently. And in six months or a year, you may be able to knock out fellows a lot bigger and heavier than you are.

You've got the weight and the machinery. In fact, you're the Kayo Kid.

And just as soon as you savvy the knockout punch, I'll take you along through the other departments of fighting. When you finish these instructions, you'll know exactly how to be a well-rounded scrapper. You'll be able to use your fists so destructively and practically that, with experience, you'll be able to move into amateur or even professional competition if you so desire. Should you go into competition, you'll have a big advantage in all-round fighting knowledge over most boys who came up during the past quarter-century.

Remember this: You don't have to be an athlete to learn how to use your fists. And it doesn't matter whether you're short, fat or skinny, timid or brave. Regardless of your size, shape, or courage, you already have the weapons with which to protect yourself. I repeat: All you have to do is learn to use them correctly.

It's true that nearly every guy can fight a little bit naturally, without having anyone show him the right way.

It's true also that the average boy or man might sit down at a piano and be able to pick out some sort of tune with one finger; or he might use the "hunt and peck" system on a typewriter until he had written a couple of lines; or he might jump into a pool and swim a bit with the dog-paddle or with his version of the breast stroke.

But he never could become a good pianist without being taught to play correctly. He never could become a fast, accurate typist without being drilled in the touch system. And he never could become a speed swimmer without being shown the crawl stroke.

It's no more natural for a beginner to step out and fight correctly than for a novice to step out and skate correctly or dive correctly or dance the tango or do the slalom on skis. Even Babe Ruth and Joe Louis, despite their prowess in other fields, were beginners when they took up golf; and each had to learn to swing a golf club correctly in order to assure accuracy and distance in his drive.

It's strange but true that certain fundamental movements seem unnatural to the beginner in nearly every activity requiring close coordination between body and mind.

Fist-fighting is no exception. Some of the fundamental moves seem awkwardly unnatural when first tried. That's particularly true of the movements in explosive long-range straight punching, the basic weapon in fist-fighting or boxing.

In fighting, as in many other activities, it's natural for the beginner to do the wrong thing. It's natural for him to swing rather than punch straight. It's natural for him to hit with the wrong knuckles of his fist. It's natural for him to use leg-tangling footwork, etc.

Let me emphasize again that you will feel very awkward when you first try the moves in long-range straight punching. I stress that awkwardness for two reasons: (1) so that you won't figure you're a hopeless palooka, and (2) so that you'll pay no attention to wisecracks of friends or sideline experts who watch your early flounderings. Remember: He laughs last who hits hardest.

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    Dempsey Jack — You're the Kayo Kid // Championship Fighting: Explosive Punching and Aggressive Defense. - 1983.Глава 6. You're the Kayo Kid. C. 10

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